14 Tips for improving the quality of life

14 Tips for improving the quality of life, our personal status and contributing to a positive life.

Did you know happiness is something internal and an art that can be learnt. It doesnot depend on external factors and circumstances.

Did you know that at Harvard, one of the most prestigious universities in the world, the most popular and successful course teaches you how to learn to be happier?
The Positive Psychology class taught by Ben Shahar attracts 1400 students per semester and 20% of Harvard graduates take this elective course. According to Ben Shahar, the class – which focuses on happiness, self-esteem and motivation – gives students the tools to succeed and face life with more joy._This 35-year-old teacher, considered by some to be “the happiness guru”, highlights in his class 14 key tips for improving the quality of our personal status and contributing to a positive life:

🚩Tip 1) *Thank God for everything you have*
Write down 10 things you have in your life that give you happiness. Focus on the good things!

🚩Tip 2) *Practice physical activity*
Experts say exercising helps improve mood. 30 minutes of exercise is the best antidote against sadness and stress.

🚩Tip 3) * Eat Healthy Breakfast*
Some people miss breakfast for lack of time or not to get fat. Studies show that breakfast gives you energy, helps you think and perform your activities successfully.

🚩Tip 4) *Be Assertive*
Ask what you want and say what you think. Being assertive helps improve your self-esteem. Being left and remaining silent creates sadness and hopelessness

🚩Tip 5) *Spend your money on experiences*
A study found that 75% of people felt happier when they invested their money in travel, courses and classes; While only the rest said they felt happier when buying things.

🚩Tip 6) *Face your challenges*
Studies show that the more you postpone something, the more anxiety and tension you generate. Write short weekly lists of tasks and complete them.

🚩Tip 7) *Put everywhere nice memories, phrases and photos of your loved ones*
Fill your fridge, your computer, your desk, your room, YOUR LIFE of beautiful memories.

🚩Tip 8) *Always greet and be nice to other people*
More than 100 inquiries state that just smiling changes the mood.

🚩Tip 9) *Wear comfortable shoes*
If your feet hurt you, you become moody, says Dr. Keinth Wapner, President of the American Orthopedics Association.

🚩Tip 10) *Take care of your posture*
Walk straight with your shoulders slightly backwards and the front view helps to maintain a good mood.

🚩Tip 11) *Listen to music* (Praise God)
It is proven that listening to music awakens you to sing, this will make your life happy.

🚩Tip 12) *What you eat has an impact on your mood*
Do not skip meals, eat lightly every 3 to 4 hours and keep glucose levels stable.
– Avoid excess white flour and sugar.
– Eat everything! Healthy.
– Vary your food.

🚩Tip 13) *Take care of yourself and feel attractive*
70% of people say they feel happier when they think they look good.

🚩Tip 14) *Fervently believe in God*
With him nothing is impossible! Happiness is like a remote control, we lose it every time, we go crazy looking for it and many times without knowing it, we are sitting on top of it.

These are mantra’s for happy life. If followed regularly, we will be the happiest person on this planet.

Story of Monk’s Self Realization

Story of Monk’s Self Realization

​I recently read this parable of the empty boat and monk.

A monk decides to meditate alone, away from his monastery.

He takes his boat out to the middle of the lake, moors it there, closes his eyes and begins his meditation.

After a few hours of undisturbed silence, he suddenly feels the bump of another boat colliding with his own. With his eyes still closed, he senses his anger rising, and by the time he opens his eyes, he is ready to scream at the boatman who dared disturb his meditation.

But when he opens his eyes, he sees it’s an empty boat that had probably got untethered and floated to the middle of the lake.

At that moment, the monk achieves self-realization, and understands that the anger is within him; it merely needs the bump of an external object to provoke it out of him. From then on, whenever he comes across someone who irritates him or provokes him to anger, he reminds himself,
“The other person is merely an empty boat. The anger is within me.”

​When chairman of Infosys foundation sudha Murthy was called “cattle class”

When chairman of Infosys foundation sudha Murthy was called “cattle class”

Here’s an excerpt from Sudha Murty’s ‘Three Thousand Stitches: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives’

Last year, I was at the Heathrow International Airport in London about to board a flight. Usually, I wear a sari even when I am abroad, but I prefer wearing a salwar kameez while travelling.

So there I was—a senior citizen dressed in typical Indian apparel at the terminal gate.

Since the boarding hadn’t started, I sat down and began to observe my surroundings.

The flight was bound for Bengaluru and so I could hear people around me chatting in Kannada.

I saw many old married couples of my age—they were most likely coming back from the US or UK after helping their children either through childbirth or a new home.

I saw some British business executives talking to each other about India’s progress.

Some teenagers were busy with the gadgets in their hands while the younger children were crying or running about the gate.

After a few minutes, the boarding announcement was made and I joined the queue.

The woman in front of me was a well-groomed lady in an Indo-Western silk outfit, a Gucci handbag and high heels.

Every single strand of her hair was in place and a friend stood next to her in an expensive silk sari, pearl necklace, matching earrings and delicate diamond bangles.

I looked at the vending machine nearby and wondered if I should leave the queue to get some water.
Suddenly, the woman in front of me turned sideways and looked at me with what seemed like pity in her eyes.

Extending her hand, she asked, ‘May I see your boarding pass, please?’ I was about to hand over my pass to her, but since she didn’t seem like an airline employee, I asked, ‘Why?’

‘Well, this line is meant for business class travellers only,’ she said confidently and pointed her finger towards the economy class queue.

‘You should go and stand there,’ she said.

I was about to tell her that I had a business class ticket but on second thoughts, held back.

I wanted to know why she had thought that I wasn’t worthy of being in the business class.

So I repeated, ‘Why should I stand there?’

She sighed. ‘Let me explain. There is a big difference in the price of an economy and a business class ticket.The latter costs almost two and a half times more than.
’I think it is three times more,’ her friend interrupted.‘Exactly,’ said the woman.

‘So there are certain privileges that are associated with a business class ticket.’

‘Really?’

I decided to be mischievous and pretended not to know.

‘What kind of privileges are you talking about?’

She seemed annoyed. ‘We are allowed to bring two bags but you can only take one.
We can board the flight from another, less-crowded queue. We are given better meals and seats. We can extend the seats and lie down flat on them. We always have television screens and there are four washrooms for a small number of passengers.’

Her friend added, ‘A priority check-in facility is available for our bags, which means they will come first upon arrival and we get more frequent flyer miles for the same flight.’
‘Now that you know the difference, you can go to the economy line,’ insisted the woman.
‘But I don’t want to go there.’ I was firm.

The lady turned to her friend. ‘It is hard to argue with these cattle-class people. Let the staff come and instruct her where to go. She isn’t going to listen to us.’

I didn’t get angry. The word ‘cattle class’ was like a blast from the past and reminded me of another incident.

One day, I had gone to an upscale dinner party in my home city of Bengaluru.

Plenty of local celebrities and socialites were in attendance. I was speaking to some guests in Kannada, when a man came to me and said very slowly and clearly in English, ‘May I introduce myself ? I am . . .’

It was obvious that he thought that I might have a problem understanding the language.
I smiled. ‘You can speak to me in English.’

‘Oh,’ he said, slightly flabbergasted. ‘I’m sorry. I thought you weren’t comfortable with English because I heard you speaking in Kannada.’

‘There’s nothing shameful in knowing one’s native language. It is, in fact, my right and my privilege. I only speak in English when somebody can’t understand Kannada.

The line in front of me at the airport began moving forward and I came out of my reverie. The two women ahead were whispering among themselves, ‘Now she will be sent to the other line. It is so long now! We tried to tell her but she refused to listen to us.’

When it was my turn to show my boarding pass to the attendant, I saw them stop and wait a short distance away, waiting to see what would happen.

The attendant took my boarding pass and said brightly, ‘Welcome back! We met last week, didn’t we?’

‘Yes,’ I replied.She smiled and moved on to the next traveller.

I walked a few steps ahead of the women intending to let this go, but then I changed my mind and came back.

‘Please tell me—what made you think that I couldn’t afford a business class ticket? Even if I didn’t have one, was it really your prerogative to tell me where I should stand? Did I ask you for help?’

The women stared at me in silence.
‘You refer to the term “cattle class”. Class does not mean possession of a huge amount of money,
’ I continued, unable to stop myself from giving them a piece of my mind.
‘There are plenty of wrong ways to earn money in this world.

You may be rich enough to buy comfort and luxuries, but the same money doesn’t define class or give you the ability to purchase it.

Mother Teresa was a classy woman. So is Manjul Bhargava, a great mathematician of Indian origin.

The concept that you automatically gain class by acquiring money is an outdated thought process.’

I left without waiting for a reply.

What’s inside your cup?

You are holding a cup of coffee when someone comes along and shoves you or shakes your arm, making you spill your coffee everywhere. Why did you spill the coffee?

“Well because someone bumped into me, of course!”

Wrong answer.

You spilled the coffee because coffee was in the cup.

If tea had been in it, you would have spilled tea.

Whatever is inside the cup is what will come out.

Therefore, when life comes along and shakes you (which will happen), whatever is inside of you will come out.

It’s easy to fake it until you get rattled.

So we have to ask ourselves….what’s in my cup?

When life gets tough, what spills over?

Joy, gratefulness, peace and humility?

Or anger, bitterness, harsh words and actions?

You choose!

Today let’s work towards filling our cups with gratitude, forgiveness, joy, words of affirmation to yourself and others, kindness, gentleness and love.


A poem by Mr Harivansh Rai Bachchan on Friendship. Lovely one. Happy friendship day.